DOI: https://doi.org/10.26641/2307-0404.2017.2.109824

Assessment of quality of life in adolescents with obesity associated with polymorphisms of the lactase gene.

A E Abaturov, A A Nikulina

Abstract


The growing obesity incidence in adolescents on the background of insufficiently studied genetic markers of formation of impairments of carbohydrate metabolism associated with the lactase gene polymorphism (SNP LCT), necessitates studying life quality particularly in this age group. Associations of 13910 C>T polymorphism of lactase gene with the quality of life in 60 adolescents aged 14-18 with obesity using the MOS-SF-36 technique (MOS 36-item Short-Form Health Survey) were studied.It was established the presence of associations of the genotype C/C 13910 of the LCT gene (p<0,05) with decrease of role functioning due to physical condition of young men and decrease of the overall health of girls. Prevention of obesity should startfrom birth of the newborn to gether with the rational organization of alimentary behavior in the family as a whole, depending on the phenotype and formation of a certain psychotype of adolescent’s personality, defined by the lactase gene polymorphism.


Keywords


quality of life; obesity; lactase gene polymorphisms; teens

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References


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GOST Style Citations


  1. Buttitta M. Quality of lifein overweight and obese children and adolescents: a literature review / M. Buttitta, C. Iliescu, A. Rousseau // Qual. Life. Res. – 2014. – Vol. 23, N 4. – P. 1117-39. doi: 10.1007/s11136-013-0568-5.
  2. Early life adversity is associated with elevated levels of circulating leptin, irisin, and decreased levels of adiponectin in midlife adults/ K.E. Joung, K.H. Park, L. Zaichenkoet [et al.] // J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. – 2014. Vol. 99, N 6. – E1055-60. doi: 10.1210/jc.2013-3669.
  3. Higgins V. Pediatric Metabolic Syndrome: Patho­physiology and Laboratory Assessment / V. Higgins, K. Adeli // EJIFCC.– 2017. – Vol. 28, N 1. – P. 25-42. PMID: 28439217.
  4. IDEFICS consortium. Longitudinal associations of lifestyle factors and weight status with insulin resis­tance (HOMA-IR) in preadolescent children: the large prospective cohort study IDEFICS / J. Peplies, C.Bör­n­horst, K. Günther [et al.] // Int. J. Behav. Nutr. Phys. Act. 2016. – Vol. 13, N 1. – P. 97. doi: 10.1186/s12966-016-0424-4.
  5. Jolliffe C.J. Development of age-specific ado­lescent metabolic syndrome criteria that are linked to theAdult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation criteria / C.J. Jolliffe, I. Janssen // J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. – 2007. –Vol. 49, N 8. – P. 891-89814. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2006.08.065.
  6. Ng M. Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013/ M. Ng, T.Fleming, M. Robinsonetal // Lancet Lond Engl. 2014. – Vol. 384, N 9945. – P. 766-781. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60460-8.
  7. Olds L.C. Lactase persistence DNA variant en­hances lactase promoter activity in vitro: functional role as a cis regulatory element / L.C. Olds, E. Sibley // Hum. Mol. Genet. – 2003. – Vol. 12, N 18. – P. 2333-2340, doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddg244.
  8. The metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents: the IDF consensus / P. Zimmet, G.M. Alberti, F. Kaufman [et al.] // Diabetes Voice. – 2007. – Vol. 52, N 4. – P. 29-32. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-5448.2007.00271.x