DOI: https://doi.org/10.32461/2226-3209.1.2018.178365

INTRODUCTION TO STUDY ON LATE SASANIAN PROTECTIVE HORSE ARMOR

Shayan Teimoor Pour

Abstract


Abstract. The principle thought underlying this paper is to characterize general sorts and the advancement of stallion protection utilized by world-class warriors of Sasanian ancient Iran. By investigation and studying about Reliefs, Comos, Terracottas, Grafittos, Seal Impression, Archaeological reports and historical and literary text, we can find oud and realize the Protective Horse Armor in this period. The types of armor protection examined in this paper are included: Scale barding armor, chain mail horse armor, barding composed of multiple elements and fragmentary bardings covering a part of the mount and full lamellar/lamellar barding. The most important part of the Sassanid army was the heavy armored cavalry
(Svaran), which played a crucial role in the wars, especially in the confrontation with the Roman infantry, and it easily collapsed the fighting arrangement and targeted them as beams of riflemen. Many Roman sources have reported that the entire Sassanid horse armored riders were covered with thick iron. It was similar to a ferrous sculpture that was both an instrument of psychological destruction and a shock weapon. Many types of horse-armored riders were formed, such as the Royal Guard. The Sasanians, like their predecessors, used armored riders in almost all battles.
Keywords: Sasanian, Protective Horse Armor, stallion protection


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